Dual Mission

Nino Perrotta
Outskirts Press (2016)
ISBN 9781478761259
Reviewed by Cynthia Moses for Reader Views (02/17)

“Dual Mission: A True Story about a Secret Service Agent and his investigative experiences to include his battle with the New York Mafia!” is about the life of Nino Perrotta, the author. The introduction about his youth describes a strict and demanding Italian immigrant father; a respectful lad with lots of energy and drive; a lad that only knew his grandfather by listening to his grandmother’s remembrances (he died before Nino’s mother was born); and a lad that grew up listening to the Mafia when they came into his father’s store.

Nino states often throughout the book how his upbringing and working at his father’s store instilled a strong sense of purpose and allowed him to learn the jargon and subtleties of the Italian Mafia. He found out that his grandfather had committed suicide in prison because he was wrongly accused of theft. This weighed heavily on Nino’s young mind. Nino’s life was directly motivating him to correct the wrongs in the world. His boundless energy, enthusiasm, and drive supported his desire to become a Secret Agent.

Anyone interested in becoming a Secret Agent or vicariously living through his worldly travels would enjoy this book, as well as the general reader. The introduction could have used better editing with the author’s overuse of “more often than not” – twice in one sentence. The rest of the book would be improved with a thorough professional edit, i.e., misspelled/mistyped words, grammar, and a name (Minev vs. Meniv, same person). Nino clearly expresses and explains all the acronyms, lingo, deceptive tactics, power plays, etc., that goes on in the law enforcement field. Such as, “His predecessor, who in my neighborhood of Mt. Vernon, would be known as ‘mameluke.’ It is a derogatory term in Italian, which equates to calling someone a ‘simpleton’ … The village idiot.”

Having traveled in Europe myself, I could relate to some of his experiences. As a friend and I were entering East Berlin through Check Point Charlie, I noticed the man sitting next to me had a knife wound in his leg. I saw the pierced hole in his jeans and the blood that was oozing and dripping from his leg. The pace of the book is moderate throughout and only gets repetitive when he is reminding us of his good looks and the ease in which he can pick-up (date and bed) women.

Nino Perrotta was the American version of James Bond 007. His highly productive and unique law enforcement experiences granted him an interesting life–Nino’s descriptive storytelling was all encompassing. Sharing his thrilling adventures in “Dual Mission” was educational for those of us with mundane lives. He made it real!

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